Riga class Frigates (1952)

Riga class Frigates

68 ASW frigates (1949-55)

In four years, the Nikolayev, Komsomol and Kaliningrad shipyards delivered 68 frigates of this type. Unlike the later units of the Petya and Mirka classes, the Riga class were not specialized ASW units, but small, multi-purpose ships derived from the Kola, themselves inspired by the last German WWII torpedo-boats.

These transitional shuips still had a conventional armament with three dual-purpose guns and twin 37mm AA mounts plus a single 21-in (533mm) quintuple TT bank and tw ASW MBU-200 rocket launchers, and at the stern two grenade racks for 12 depth charges and four launchers (12 in reserve). Overall, a soviet reboot of the WW2 US destroyer escorts, with more modern electronics. Unlike the Kola class which was basically a WW2 program completed just after the war, the Riga class were much simpler, more compact and more modern, designed for mass production: With sixty-eight delivered in all, this was probably the largest large ASW program anywhere in the cold war. They served also in the Bulgarian, East German, Finnish and Indonesian navies and copied by the Chinese as the Jiangnan class (Type 065) frigates. Obsolete in 1965, the Riga were were gradually phased out and replaced by the Petya class until the late 1970s and all decommissioned in the 1980s.

Development of the Riga class

Project 50 was defined in 1950, on specific Stalin’s injunction for mass production of a very simplified Kola. After the release of the first patrol ship of Project 42, the Council of Ministers of the USSR ordered the Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry and the Naval Ministry to take control of the development of the Project 50 patrol ship and the construction of a lead ship with a displacement of 1200 tons according to these drawings, and the following deadlines were set for the work:

Complete the development of the draft design in September and submit it to the USSR Council of Ministers in October 1950;
Complete the development of the technical design in February and submit it to the USSR Council of Ministers in March 1951;
Start construction of the lead ship in the II quarter of 1951 and submit it for state tests in the III quarter of 1952.

Despite all the positive results obtained during the tests, the first post-war domestic TFR pr. 42 was built in a limited series, and on the personal instructions of I.V. Stalin, the development of a TTZ for a new patrol ship with a total displacement of 1,200 tons of project 50 began.

The Council of Ministers of the USSR ordered the Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry and the Naval Ministry to develop a draft 50 new TFR and build a lead ship on this in the following terms:
a) complete the development of the draft design in September and submit it to the Council of Ministers of the USSR in October 1950;
b) complete the development of the technical design in February and submit it to the Council of Ministers of the USSR in March 1951;
c) start building the lead ship in the second quarter of 1951 and submit it for state tests in the third quarter of 1952.

All work was entrusted to TsKB-820. In July-August 1950, various technical issues were negotiated, which would make it possible to ensure the receipt of a given displacement and the necessary qualities of the ship. However, in the given dimensions, it was not possible to fully meet the requirements for wind resistance. Studies have shown that with the linear placement of the power plant, it is possible to provide a displacement at a given level. In the course of the study, a combined scheme of two machine-boiler plants was considered. For her, SKBK created boilers with blowing into furnaces of the KVG-57/28 type. The boilers were with natural circulation, vertical, with a developed radiation surface, one-way duct of flue gases, and two-front heating. The temperature of the superheated steam was assumed to be moderate (370 ° С), and the working pressure was up to 28 kg / cm 2. The new constructive scheme of the ship’s boiler was the basis for the creation of high-powered small-sized boilers for all classes of post-war surface warships. The most important task of the subsequent high forcing of the furnace with an increase in its heat load three times was solved. After numerous disputes, the linear arrangement of the power plant was adopted.

Variants with weapons that were very different from Project 42 were also considered. So it was supposed to replace the two bow mounts B-34USM with one twin mount of a closed type with the same 100-mm guns as in the B-34USM. The development of such an installation was then carried out at OKB-172. Attempts were also made to replace the MBU-200 with the MBU-600 and 37-mm assault rifles with 25-mm. Nevertheless, the final composition of the ship’s armament differed from Project 42 only by a decrease in the number of B-34USM installations from 4 to 3, the number of torpedo tubes from 3 to 2, and a decrease in artillery ammunition by 15%.

The preliminary design was completed by the Leningrad branch of TsKB-820 on time. In the course of its consideration, the Acting Minister of the Navy, Admiral A.G. Golovko, approved a proposal to replace 4 BMB-1s with 4 BMB-2s. The standard displacement obtained in the draft design was 1,059 tons. In the technical design, the value of the standard displacement increased to 1,068 tons. In the process of considering the technical design presented by the kit and on time, it turned out that it was impossible to store and use the equipped ammunition on the ship. TGA in strict accordance with the current instructions. Due to the additional volumes received on the ship, even with the existing standard displacement, it became possible to take almost twice as much fuel (with the highest displacement) and bring the cruising range to almost 2000 miles. The presence of only a two-tube torpedo tube instead of the traditional three-tube torpedo was constantly criticized. Finally, when approving the technical design, it was decided to oblige the SKB-700 MSP, by order of the MTU Navy, to develop in 1951 a technical design of a three-tube torpedo launcher for the ships of Project 50. Later, these devices were developed and installed on the ships of this project.
The chief designer of the SKR pr.50 was first D.D. Zhukovsky, then V.I. Neganov, and at the final stage from the end of 1953, B.I.Kupensky became, and Captain 1st Rank V.S. Avdeev was the observer from the Navy.

The ship of project 50, like the SKR of project 42, was smooth-deck with longitudinal sheer, one-tube, with one mast and two superstructures. The nasal formations of PM in comparison with the TFR pr. 42 were significantly sharpened, which, according to experts, should have significantly reduced spray formation. This PM was used by the last chief designer in his further projects. All combat posts and rooms, with the exception of the bomb cellar N6, the midshipman’s compartment and the tiller compartment, were provided with a closed passage, which was unusual for such a small ship. The power plant compartments, the wheelhouse and the shields of the artillery mounts were booked with anti-fragmentation armor 7-8 mm thick. The whole hull is electrically welded, except for the connection of the upper deck with the side and removable sheets. According to the test results, both the overall and local strength were found to be satisfactory. The vibration of the stern end at all moves was less than that of the EM pr.30-bis and corresponded to the time norms.

On sea trials, the ship with a normal displacement of 1134 tons developed an average speed of 29.5 knots at 386 rpm of propellers. Despite the decrease in the number of revolutions in comparison with the project 42, it was not possible to get rid of erosion on the suction sides of the blades at the propeller hub. The ship, like its predecessor, had two rudders, but the propellers, due to the larger diameter (reduced speed), now protruded beyond the main line. This circumstance worsened the conditions for the passage of the ship along inland waterways and made sailing on the shallows and in river estuaries more dangerous. As a result of the seaworthy tests carried out in a sea state of 4.5 and 6 points, it was found that with 4 points of excitement, the speed of the ship and the use of any combat and technical means were not limited. With greater excitement, the speed was reduced to 23 knots (6 points). With a sea state of 6, the main artillery can only be used at speeds up to 16 knots, the use of torpedo, anti-submarine and mine weapons is impossible.

The general assessment of the ship’s maneuverability and seaworthiness was found to be satisfactory. The seaworthiness of the ship in the use of weapons was estimated at 4 points, although in waves up to 6 points, it is possible to use artillery weapons.

The turbo-gear unit of the TV-9 spacecraft was a single-hull active-reactive single-flow turbine with a capacity of 10,000 hp, a single-flow surface condenser located along the axis with a bifurcation of power. TV-9 could be started up from a cold state. During the period of state tests of serial ships, breakdowns of the working blades began to be detected. A special commission chaired by Professor M.I. Grinberg found out that the indicated breakdowns were due to resonant vibrations at full speed (forward and backward). The manufacturer and its SKBT accepted the stresses that were increased against those previously accepted in the marine turbine construction, and did not provide constructively and technologically high-quality manufacturing. In April and September 1954, resolutions of the Council of Ministers of the USSR were adopted, in pursuance of which the defects of the TV-9 turbines were corrected. In this regard, a temporary limitation was introduced to the maximum travel speed, limited to 25 knots. The restrictions were lifted in 1955. However, in the future there were malfunctions with these turbines.

Three 100-mm B-34USMA-type guns were installed on the ship. Guidance of gun mounts was carried out automatically using a remote control and manually. It was the first domestic universal gun mount with automatic remote guidance from a rangefinder post (PUS “Sfera-50”). There were no serious complaints about the AU, however, like on Project 42, the guide tray sagged during operation, and the sleeve reflector did not always ensure free falling of the sleeves. To control the firing of 100-mm artillery, a stabilized sighting post SVP-42-50 was installed, combined with the antenna of the Yakor radar. The range of its action on a sea target is 180 cab, and on an air target up to 165 cab. The twin-tube torpedo launcher installed on the ship was intended for firing only straight forward steam-gas torpedoes of the 53-38, 53-39, 53-ZEU, 53-51 types. New in the radio-technical armament of the ship in comparison with the TFR pr. 42 was the adoption of a Lin-type radar as a surface target detection radar, which could detect low-flying aircraft and the Pegas-2 hydroacoustic station. At a speed of the SKR of about 20 knots, this GAS was able to detect submarines at periscope depth at a distance of 14 cabs, and an anchor mine – 7 cabs (according to technical conditions, only 3 cabs were specified).

In short

All work was entrusted to TsKB-820. In July-August 1950, various technical issues were negotiated, which would make it possible to ensure the fulfillment of the TTZ, but it was not possible to fully fulfill the requirements for wind resistance in the given dimensions.

Studies of engines have shown that with a linear arrangement of the power plant, it is possible to provide a displacement at a given level, and a combined scheme of two machine-boiler plants was considered. For this, SKBK created boilers with blowing into furnaces of the KVG-57/28 type with natural circulation, of a vertical shape, with a developed radiation surface, a one-way duct of flue gases and two-front heating. The superheated steam temperature reached 370 ° С, which was considered a moderate temperature, and the working pressure reached 28 kg / cm². The new structural scheme of the ship’s boiler was the basis for the creation of highly boosted small-sized boilers for all classes of post-war surface warships, thereby solving the most important task of the subsequent high forcing of the furnace with an increase in its thermal load three times. After numerous disputes, the linear arrangement of the power plant was adopted.

Options were considered with weapons that were very different from Project 42: it was supposed to replace two B-34USM bow mounts with one closed-type twin mount with the same guns (its development was carried out in OKB-172). Attempts were also made to replace the MBU-200 with the MBU-600, and the 37-mm assault rifles with the 25-mm. However, everything was limited to a decrease in the number of B-34USM installations from four to three, the number of torpedo tubes from three to two, and a 15% decrease in artillery ammunition.

The preliminary design was completed by the Leningrad branch of TsKB-820 on time. In the course of its consideration, the Acting Minister of the Navy, Admiral A.G. Golovko, approved a proposal to replace the BMB-1 class bombers with the BMB-2 class. The standard displacement obtained in the draft design was 1059 tons, in the technical design it increased by another 9 tons. Due to the additional volumes received on the ship, it became possible to take almost twice as much fuel (with the highest displacement) and bring the cruising range to almost 2000 miles …

However, in the further process of consideration, it turned out that it was impossible on the ship to ensure the storage and use of the ammunition equipped with the TGA in strict accordance with the current instructions. Also, the presence of only a two-tube torpedo tube instead of the traditional three-tube torpedo was constantly criticized. Finally, when approving the technical project, it was decided to oblige the SKB-700 to rework the project commissioned by the MTU of the Naval Forces, having worked out the option of installing a three-tube torpedo tube, which was successfully completed.

The chief designer was at first D. D. Zhukovsky, then V. I. Neganov received this position, and at the final stage, from the end of 1953, B. I. Kupensky became. The observer from the Navy was Captain 1st Rank V.S.Avdeev.

Detailed design

Smaller dimensions had engineers completely rethink propulsion, with a compact turbines fed by boilers overpressured boilers in the very same compartments.
The ship was smooth-decked with longitudinal sheer, single-tube, with one mast and two superstructures. The nasal formations in the theoretical drawing were significantly sharpened compared to project 42, which should have significantly reduced splashing (this drawing was used by the last chief designer in his further projects). A closed passage was provided for all combat posts and rooms, with the exception of the bomb cellar No. 6, the midshipman’s compartment and the tiller compartment, which was unusual for a small ship. The compartments of the main power plant, the wheelhouse and the shields of the artillery mounts were booked with anti-fragmentation armor 7-8 mm thick. The entire hull was electrically welded, except for the connection of the upper deck with the side and removable sheets. Overall and local strength were found to be satisfactory in the tests. The vibration of the aft end on all moves was less than that of destroyers 30-bis and corresponded to the temporary norms.

Propulsion

On sea trials, the ship at normal displacement developed an average speed of 29.5 knots at 386 rpm, which was less than that of Project 42. However, even this did not help to get rid of erosion on the suction sides of the blades at the propeller hub. The ship had two rudders, but the propellers, due to the larger diameter, now protruded beyond the main line, and this worsened the conditions for the passage of the ship along inland waterways, making it more dangerous to sail on shallows and in river estuaries. In seaworthy tests in a sea state of 4, 5 and 6 points, it was found that with 4 points of excitement, the speed of the ship and the use of any military and technical means were not limited, with an excitement of 6 points, the speed was reduced to 23 knots, and only the main one could be used. artillery (at speeds up to 16 knots). The general assessment of the ship’s maneuverability and seaworthiness was found to be satisfactory. The seaworthiness of the ship in the use of weapons was estimated at 4 points.
Engine

The turbo-gear unit of the TV-9 spacecraft was a single-hull active-reactive single-flow turbine with a capacity of 10,000 horsepower and a single-flow surface condenser located along the axis with a bifurcation of power. TV-9 could be started up from a cold state. During the period of state tests of serial ships, breakdowns of the working blades began to be detected. A special commission chaired by Professor M.I.Grinberg found out that these breakdowns arose due to resonant vibrations at full strokes (both forward and backward). The manufacturer and its SKBT accepted the stresses that were increased against those previously accepted in the marine turbine construction, without ensuring its constructive and technologically high-quality manufacturing. In April and September 1954, resolutions of the Council of Ministers of the USSR were adopted, in pursuance of which the defects of the TV-9 turbines were corrected, in connection with which a temporary limitation on the maximum speed (25 knots) was introduced until 1955, but malfunctions arose with these turbines and further.

Riga-class frigate
Riga class ASW frigates

Riga class underway, laft-right overviews

Armament

Three 100-mm B-34USMA-type guns were installed on the ship. The aiming of these gun mounts was carried out automatically using a remote control, as well as manually. It was the first domestic universal gun mount with automatic remote guidance from a rangefinder post (PUS “Sfera-50”). There were no serious comments to them, but it was found that the guide tray flexed during operation, and the sleeve reflector did not always ensure free falling of the sleeves. To control the firing of 100-mm artillery, a stabilized sighting post SVP-42-50 was installed, combined with the antenna of the Yakor radar, whose range of action against a sea target was 180 cab, and for an air target – up to 165 cab. The two-tube torpedo launcher installed on the ship was intended for firing only straight-forward steam-gas torpedoes of types 53-38, 53-39, 53-ZEU, 53-51. New radio equipment was installed – the Linh surface target detection radar, which could detect low-flying aircraft, and the Pegas-2 hydroacoustic station, which, at a speed of about 20 knots, was able to detect submarines at a periscope depth at a range of 14 cabs, and an anchor mine – 7 cab (with the minimum requirement – 3 cab).

100mm B-34

The B-34 gun mount was designed in the design bureau of the Bolshevik plant under the leadership of II Ivanov in 1936. The prototype was made in the middle of 1937 and was tested at the proving ground in August-September. On September 21, 1937, the project was returned for revision. The situation repeated itself in December 1938 and 1939.

In 1940, the B-34s were not brought into service and were not accepted into service. But the first B-34s were installed on type 26 and 26-bis cruisers (Kirov) without an electric drive and were manually operated, as a result, effective fire on air targets was impossible.

  • Barrel length 57.95 mm/56
  • Chamber volume, dm³ 7.985
  • Wedge type breech block
  • Projectile weight, kg 15.8
  • Initial muzzle velocity 910 m/s
  • Loading with separate charge
  • Rate of fire: 16 rpm
  • Total mass 12,500 kgs (13,530 light)
  • Barrel lifting angle 85°
  • Elevation speed 25°/s
  • Traverse speed 20°/s
  • Maximum firing range, 22,200m ()
  • Ceiling 15,000 ()
  • Crew: 9: Commander, gunners, loaders, pointers

Twin 37 mm B11/B11M

RBU-200 ASWRL

Triple torpedo tubes

Depth charges

Electronics

⚙ Riga class specifications (1954)

Dimensions 91 x 10.2 x 3.16 m
Displacement 1160, 1416t FL
Crew 175
Propulsion 2 shafts turbines TV9, 8 boilers 21,000 shp
Speed 28 knots top speed
Range
Armament 3×100 mm AA (3×1), 4×37 mm AA, 2 x MBU 200 RLM, 2 DCR, 4 DCT 1×3 533 mm TT ASW
Sensors Radar Don-2, Slim Net, Sun Visor, sonar Pegas

Construction

By the end of 1958, a series of 68 ships had been built. Comparison of the patrol ships of the project 50 of the first series with foreign counterparts shows that the ship was superior in driving performance, but inferior in cruising range, since it was not intended to escort ocean convoys (like all Soviet ships). According to the general armament, it was equal in strength to the USS Butler (DD-636) and was inferior to the USS Dealey DE-1006, in terms of maximum firing range and the magnitude of a minute salvo it exceeded, but not in conditions of intense splashing; finally, anti-aircraft and anti-submarine weapons were not as effective as those of the American destroyers: there were no homing torpedoes, the range of bombardment and the action of the GAS was not high. The 50-PLO project made it possible to catch up with the Dealey in terms of armament, but at that time more efficient ships began to appear.

The lead ship was laid down on the stocks of the plant №445 (now the plant named after 61 Kommunar) in Nikolaev on December 20, 1951 and received the name “Ermine”, launched on July 30, 1952. Adopted to the Navy after lengthy trials only on July 30, 1954. In total, 68 ships were built before 1958:
-Plant No. 445 (named after 61 Communards) in Nikolaev – 20 units
– Shipyard No. 820 (“Yantar”) in Kaliningrad – 41
-SHP №199 (named after Leninsky Komsomol) in Komsomolsk-on-Amur – 7

This was the first major program for the construction of the TFR of the domestic fleet, after the 30-bis project, it was the second largest series of ships in the domestic fleet in terms of number, the displacement of which was more than 1000 tons. In addition, according to our documentation, 4 ships were built in China. One of the ships, “Arkhangelsk Komsomolets”, even underwent repairs in 1973-1974 with the modernization and dismantling of the torpedo tube.

Modifications

Almost all ships of Project 50 were modernized in 1959-1960, being equipped with new weapons: the MBU-200 bomb was replaced by two RBU-2500, the two-tube torpedo tube – by the three-tube TTA-53-50 for firing homing anti-submarine torpedoes, the Pegasus sonar -2 “- on” Pegas-3M “. The Yakor fire control radar as part of the SVP-42-50 was replaced with the Yakor-M2 radar, the Lin radar – with the Neptun-M radar, the Guys-1M4 radar – with the Fut-N radar… In connection with the changes in the weapons, the components of the load also changed: to maintain stability at a given level, solid ballast had to be placed.

Reception

They were also equipped with the new SFERA-50 firing system identical to the Kotlin’s system, but it was handicapped by excessive calculation time of more than 35 seconds. Their light hull could perform at 28 knots in calm weather, but fell to 23 by force 6 gale, its guns inoperative because of the swell, and poorly efficient from 16 knots already.

Despite the many shortcomings that were revealed in the power plant due to breakdowns of TV-9, the construction of ships of project 50 proceeded quite quickly and by the end of 1958 the entire series of 68 ships was built. Comparison of the SKR pr.50 of the first series with foreign counterparts shows that if our ship surpasses them in terms of driving performance, then it was significantly inferior in cruising range. This is understandable, since our ships were not intended to escort ocean convoys. An integrated assessment of weapons shows that the TFR pr.50 was at the level of the TFR “Butler” built during the BMB and was inferior to the TFR of the “Dili” type built in the 50s (both US Navy).

In terms of artillery armament, if we consider only the maximum firing range and the magnitude of the minute salvo, then the SKR pr.50 was somewhat superior to foreign counterparts, but their turret mounts made it possible to use artillery in conditions of more intense splashing and excitement. Finally, the automatic 76-mm artillery mounts of the SKR “Dili” were significantly more effective than the domestic B-34USMA mounts when firing at air targets. In anti-submarine weapons, the superiority of the TFR “Dili” was significant. So, its torpedo tubes already used homing anti-submarine torpedoes, the Mk108 rocket launcher had an effective firing range of 4.5 cab and a rate of fire up to 12 rounds per minute, and the GAS installed on it had a submarine detection range of more than 30 cab. Only the ships modernized according to the 50-PLO project did anti-submarine weapons and means of support more or less correspond to that time, but the leading naval powers already had other ships with even greater anti-submarine capabilities.

Modifications. Almost all TFR pr. 50 of the Russian Navy in 1959-1960. were modernized according to pr. 50-PLO. They were reinforced with anti-submarine weapons: the MBU-200 bomb was replaced with two RBU-2500, the two-tube TA was replaced with a three-tube TTA-53-50 for firing homing anti-submarine torpedoes, the Pegas-2 GAS – with the Pegas-3M. The ships of the early series had the Guys-1M4 radar, which was later replaced by the Fut-N radar. The Yakor fire control radar as part of the SVP-42-50 was replaced with the Yakor-M2 radar, the Lin radar – with the Neptun-M radar. In connection with the changes in armament, the components of the load also changed. To maintain stability at a given level, it was necessary to place solid ballast on the SKR of the last series and on the modernized ones.

TFR “Arkhangelsk Komsomolets” in 1973-74. underwent repairs with modernization and dismantling of the torpedo tube.
Construction program. The head ICR of project 50 was laid down on the stocks of plant No. 445 (now the plant named after 61 Kommunar) in Nikolaev on December 20, 1951 and received the name “Ermine”, launched on July 30, 1952. Adopted to the Navy after lengthy trials only on July 30, 1954. In total, 68 ships were built before 1958: at plant No. 445 (named after 61 Communards) in Nikolaev – 20 units, at Shipyard No. 820 (“Yantar”) in Kaliningrad – 41, at Shipyard No. 199 (named after Lenkom) in Komsomolsk -on-Amur – 7. This was the first largest program for the construction of the TFR of the domestic fleet, after EM pr. 30-bis – the second largest series of ships in the domestic fleet in terms of number, the displacement of which is more than 1000 tons. In addition, 4 ships were built according to our documentation in China.

17 ships from the USSR Navy were sold to the following countries: Bulgaria – SKR-67 in 1957 (renamed “Darzki”); SKR-53 in 1958 (“Dare”); “Kobchik” in 1985 (“Baudry”); Indonesia – “Puma”, “Sarich”, “Korsak” and “Grizon” in 1963 (renamed respectively to “Slamet Rijari”, “Jons Sudarso”, “Ngurah Rai” and “Mongin Sidi”); “Pelican” in 1964 (“Nuku”); Bison, Bison and Stork in 1965 (renamed Hang Tuan, Kaki Ali and Lambung Mangkurat); GDR – “The Deer” in 1956 (“Ernst Thalmann”); Tour in 1957 (Karl Liebknecht); Sable and Raccoon in 1959 (Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels); Finland – SKR-69 and “Owl” in 1964 (renamed “Hameenmaa” and “Uusimaa”). In addition, 5 more TFRs were built in China under a Soviet license, converted by the Chinese into URO frigates.

Status for 2005 The last ships of this series were decommissioned in 1990-91.
Carried out a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt: TFR “Jaguar” in 1967 and 1971; TFR “Panther” in 1970; TFR “Kunitsa” in 1967 and 1973; TFR “Raven” in 1967 and 1968; SKR-57 in 1968; to the armed forces of Syria: TFR “Kunitsa” in 1968; the armed forces of Egypt and Syria: SKR-77 in 1973

Modernization

In the years 65-75, the ships still n Soviet service (many had been transfered already), were modernized to the new ASM standards with the new RBU-2500 (128 tubes total) and two twin 25 mm guns, the new fixed bow sonar Herkules, and solid ballast for better stability. After Stalin’s death, Krushchev reduced orders and stopped the program altogether.

On some ships (SKR-59 in 12.1971, SKR-73, Pingvin, Rosomakha) were added 2×2 25 mm 2M-3M
On some ships (SKR-59 in 12.1971) were added 2×1 45 mm 21KM
On SKR-76 in 1974 TT was removed, added SPS-22, SPS-44, SPB-7
In 1959-60 DTA-53-50 has been replaced by 1×3 533 mm TTA-53-50 (3 SET-65 torpedoes).
MBU-200 has been replaced by 2×16 RBU-2500 Smerch (128 RGB-25). On Pingvin then removed
Gyuys-1M4 air search radar was replaced by Fut-N air/surface search radar, Lin surface search radar was replaced by Neptun-M surface search radar, Yakor radar was replaced by radar Yakor -M, Pegas-2M sonar has been replaced by Pegas-3M
On 1 unit added 4×6 RKU-36U Burun
On some ships was added MG-7 Braslet anti-saboteur sonar
On some ships was added MG-26 Khosta underwater communication system
On SKR-69 was added 1x 2B9 Vasilyok ship-borne decoy dispenser system launcher. Then removed.
On Pantera was added1?x7 55 mm MRG-1 Ogonyok grenade launcher (RG-55M, GRS-55 grenades)
Trials ship: OS-188 (Yaguar) 28.06.1977. MR-100 Parus-N radar instead of Fut-N, Parus-B fire control system instead of Yakor
Target-ship: SM-141 (SKR-63) 20.06.1987
Heating-power ship: OT-28 (SKR-72) 24.06.1991

Foreign operators

Chinese Jiangnan class

China built four upgraded units, equipped with anti-ship missiles instead of torpedo tubes, and licensed the upgraded Kiangnan. 2 units in 1953 in parts, 2 units were built under license (the Chinese Type – Project 01): Shanghai Chudun – Pin-Hsiang 504, 1988 508 1955/1957/1959 Guilin, Kun-Ming 506? / 1957/1959, Guangzhou – Guiyang 1955/26.09.1956/1958 505, 507 Cheng-Du 1955/28.04.1956/1958. In 1971-73 instead of the torpedo tubes are set 1×2 launcher ASM, 2×2 14.5 mm

Bulgarian Smeli class

Three ships, Derzki 31, then 15, then 11, from 1989 12 (till до 12.04.1957 SKR-67) decommissioned in 1990, Smeli 16, then 12 (till 15.10.1958 SKR-53) decommissioned in 1989?, Bodri 13 (till 11.1985 Kobchik) decommissioned in 1993. Bodri – added 1×4 launchers SAM Strela-2 (16 missiles 9M32), 1×2 30 mm AK-230, 2×2 25 mm 2M-3M.

East German Thälmann class

Ernst Thalmann (till 14.07.1956 Olen ) 1-61, from 1958 401, then 40, from 1.12.1961 101, from 29.11.1965 121, from 1.12.1971 141 decommissioned 29.08.1977, Karl Marx (till 19.10.1956 Sobol ) 1-62, from 1958 501, from 1.01.1960 601, then 41, then 402, from 1.01.1962 102, from 29.11.1965 122, from 1.12.1971 142 decommissioned 31.08.1977, Karl Liebknecht (till 14.01.1957 Tur) 601, from 1.01.1960 502, then 42, then 403, from 1.11.1962 103, then 213, from 29.11.1965 123 decommissioned 1.10.1968, Friedrich Engels (till 19.10.1959 Enot) 701, from 1.01.1960 702, then 43, then 404, from 1.12.1962 104, then 214, from 29.11.1965 124, from 1.10.1968 123 then floating barraks, decommissioned 10.10.1969.

Finish Usimaa class

Uusimaa 01 (till 29.04.1964 Filin) decommissioned in 1979, Hameenmaa 02 (till 8.06.1964 SKR-69) decommissioned in 1985. 2×2 37 mm V-11M replaced with 2×1 40 mm Bofors, added 1×2 30 mm AK-230. In 1971 re-equipment to minelayers: stern 1×1 100 mm B-34USMA removed

Indonesian xxx class

Jons Sudarso 351 (till 24.01.1963 Sarych) decommissioned in 1986, Slamet Rijari 352 (till 24.01.1963 Puma) decommissioned in 1973, Ngurah Rai 353 (till 24.01.1963 Korsak) decommissioned in 1974, Walter Monginsidi 355 (till 24.01.1963 Grizon) decommissioned in 1971, Lambung Mangkurat 357 (till 24.04.1965 Aist) decommissioned in 1986, Hang Tuan 358 (till 24.04.1965 Zubr) decommissioned in 1971, Kaki Ali 359 (till .04.1965 Bizon) decommissioned in 1985, Nuku 360 (till 28.02.1964 Pelikan) decommissioned in 1981.

Riga class escorting a supply ship
A Riga-class ship in April 1970 in the philippines
Bundesarchiv, Rostock 25th anniversaryof the DDR, parade.
A Riga-class ship in April 1970 in the philippines
A Riga-class ship in April 1970 in the philippines
Riga class frigate off Ryukyu islands, 1971
Riga class ship at the Tirpitz mole, Kieler Woche, 1965
A Riga-class ship in April 1970 in the philippines
Finnish Minelayer Hameenmaa 1982
Frigate_Haemeenmaa-HD
SH-3D of HS-4 over a Soviet Riga class frigate 1971
Soviet frigate SKR-61 underway in the 1970s
Soviet_Riga-class_frigate_underway
Soviet_Riga_class_frigate-overview

Resources

on wikipedia
On dbpedia.com
On shipshub.com
russianships.info
Russian Archive (logs and additional infos)

Service & combat records

Baltic Fleet:

SKR-4 (from 4.03.1959 Northern Fleet, from 14.09.1959 Pacific Fleet), 5, 8, 10 (from 4.03.1959 Northern Fleet, from 14.09.1959 Pacific Fleet), 14, 15, 50 (from 22.10.1956 Pacific Fleet), 54 (from 22.10.1956 Pacific Fleet), 55 (from 22.10.1956 Pacific Fleet), 56 (from 10.10.1956 Northern Fleet, from 2.10.1963 Baltic Fleet, from 27.11.1977 КВФ), 59 (from 14.02.1957 Northern Fleet, from 14.07.1957 Pacific Fleet), 60 (from 10.10.1956 Nothern Fleet), 61 (from 14.02.1957 Northern Fleet, from 14.07.1957 Pacific Fleet), 62 (from 14.02.1957 Northern Fleet, from 14.07.1957 Pacific Fleet), 64, 65, 68, 69, 74 (from 12.02.1958 Northern Fleet, from 14.09.1959 Pacific Fleet), 75 (from 12.02.1958 Nothern Fleet, from 14.09.1959 Pacific Fleet), Bars (from 9.06.1955 Northern Fleet), Barsuk, Enot, Kobchik, Kuguar (from 24.03.1958 Northern Fleet, from 4.03.1988 Baltic Fleet), Leopard (from 30.12.1954 Nothern Fleet), Los (from 7.02.1956 Northern Fleet, from 22.10.1956 Pacific Fleet), Lun (from 7.02.1956 Northern Fleet, from 22.10.1956 Pacific Fleet), Olen (from 27.02.1956 Northern Fleet, from 20.03.1956 Baltic Fleet), Rosomakha (from 30.12.1954 Nothern Fleet, from 30.11.1973 Baltic Fleet), Sobol , Tur (from 27.02.1956 Northern Fleet, from 20.03.1956 Baltic Fleet),

Black Sea Fleet:

SKR-51, 52 (from 18.07.1960 Northern Fleet, 18.01.1964 Baltic Fleet), 53, 57, 58 (from 19.09.1957 Northern Fleet), 63 (from 19.09.1957 Northern Fleet), 66, 67, Volk, Voron, Gornostay, Grizon, Korsak, Kunitca, Norka (from 18.07.1960 Northern Fleet), Pantera (from 21.06.1977 КВФ), Puma, Rys , Sarych, Yaguar.

Northern Fleet:

SKR-70 (from 29.10.1963 Baltic Fleet, from 21.12.1965 Northern Fleet), 71 (from 29.10.1963 Baltic Fleet, from 21.12.1965 Northern Fleet), 72 (from 17.10.1966 Baltic Fleet, from 23.11.1967 Northern Fleet), 73 (from 15.11.1984 Caspian Flotilia), 76 (from 25.12.1965 Baltic Fleet, from 24.06.1967 Northern Fleet), 77 (from 28.02.1969 Black Sea Fleet, from 7.08.1979 Caspian Flotilia), 80, 81

Pacific Fleet:

Aist, Bizon, Gepard, Giena, Zubr, Pelikan, Pingvin

JAGUAR

From 10/25/1968 “Komsomolets of Georgia”, from 08/31/1977 OS-188. December 7, 1951 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on July 23, 1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 02/14/1953; entered service on 4/4/1954 and on 4/30/1954 included in the Black Sea Fleet; 1-30.6.1967 and 1.11.1970-31.3.1971, while on military service in the zone of military operations in the Mediterranean Sea, carried out a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt; On 28/06/1977, withdrawn from service, disarmed and reorganized into the OS, and on 13/08/1987 was excluded from the lists of naval vessels in connection with the delivery to the OFI for dismantling and sale; 10/01/1988 disbanded and later cut into metal in Sevastopol.

ROSOMAKHA

On January 1, 1952, he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on June 19, 1952, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 16.8.1953, entered into service on 30.4.1954 and on 17.5.1954 was included in the 4th Navy. In the fall of 1954, he was transferred through inland water systems from the Baltic to the White Sea and on 30.12.1954 was transferred to the Federation Council, and on 30.11.1973 was transferred to the Leningrad Naval Base; from 20.8.1958 to 20.11.1959, modernized at Shipyard No. 820, and from 11.6.1971 to 30.11.1973 and from 7.8.1979 to 1.2.1980 at SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent major repairs; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 11/01/1989 disbanded and later cut into metal in Leningrad.

LEOPARD

11/13/1951 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and 12/21/1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on April 30, 1953, entered service on April 30, 1954, and on May 10, 1954, first included in the 4th Navy, and in the fall of 1954 transferred via inland water systems from the Baltic to the White Sea and on December 30. 1954 listed in the Federation Council; from 10.11.1959 to 16.12.1960 Shipyard No. 820 underwent modernization and medium repair; On December 10, 1961, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and first in Pala Bay (Polyarny), and on September 18, 1965, in Dolgaya-Zapadnaya Bay (Granitny settlement), it was put to rest; 3.9.1981 was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 1.9.1981 was disbanded and later cut into metal in Murmansk.

PANTHER

From 7.7.1977 “Soviet Turkmenistan”. December 5, 1951 was enlisted in the lists of the ships of the Navy and on 2/21/1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 im. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 08/20/1952, entered into operation on 05/21/1954 and on 05/31/1954 included in the Black Sea Fleet; 6-11.8.1966 paid a visit to Alexandria (Egypt); 5.8-15.12.1970, while on military service in the zone of hostilities in the Mediterranean Sea, carried out the task of providing assistance to the armed forces of Egypt; 6/21/1977 transferred to the KKF and in the summer of 1977 transferred through the Volga-Don canal from the Azov to the Caspian Sea; 06/25/1988 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1988 was disbanded.

LYNX

December 7, 1951 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on April 22, 1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 im. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 31.12.1952, entered into service on 21.5.1954 and on 31.5.1954 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On December 1, 1962, it was decommissioned, mothballed and first in Ochakov, January 31, 1975 – in Donuzlav, and on January 29, 1976 – in Poti it sucked, but on January 18, 1982 it was reactivated and put back into operation ; 04/19/1990 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 1.8.1990 was disbanded and later cut into metal in Sevastopol.

ZUBR

41]. 05/13/1952 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 08/29/1952 laid down in the shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on 9.7.1953; entered into operation on 31.5.1954 and on 14.6.1954 was included in the Pacific Fleet; 04.24.1965 excluded from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Hang Tuan”; On November 1, 1965, it was disbanded, in 1971 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

GORNOSTAY

December 7, 1951 enlisted in the lists of the ships of the Navy and on December 20, 1951 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 im. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on June 30, 1952, commissioned on June 30, 1954 and on February 25, 1955, included in the Black Sea Fleet; was the lead ship of the series; On December 1, 1962, it was decommissioned, mothballed and first in Sevastopol, on September 10, 1968 – in Ochakov, and on May 22, 1972 – in Donuzlav, it was sucked, but on February 15, 1989 it was reactivated and put back into operation ; from 03/20/1981 to 11/12/1986 the shipyard in Poti underwent a major overhaul; 6/24/1991 was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; On October 1, 1991 it was disbanded and in the fall of 1992 it was cut into metal in Sevastopol.

BIZON

5/13/1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 4/10/1952 laid down in the shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (taken out of the dock) on 7/7/1953, commissioned on 6/30/1954 and on 7/7/1954 included in the Pacific Fleet; 04.24.1965 excluded from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; It was renamed into “Kaki Ali” and on November 1, 1965, it was disbanded, and in 1971 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

BARS

December 7, 1951 was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on April 25, 1952, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on July 25, 1953, entered service on June 30, 1954 and on July 8, 1954, included in the 4th Navy, and on June 9, 1955, it was transferred to the Northern Fleet and in the summer of 1955 transferred to the inland waterways systems from the Baltic to the White Sea; from 20.8.1958 to 20.11.1959, Shipyard No. 820 underwent modernization and medium repair; from 11/29/1967 to 02/15/1968 at KMOLZ in Kronstadt, from 9.4 to 17.6.1971, from 3.9.1974 to 1.9.1975 and from 1.2.1980 to 1.10.1981 at SRZ-7 in Tallinn, and from 10/9/1986 to 11/11/1987 at the “Krasnaya Kuznitsa” shipyard in Arkhangelsk again underwent medium repair; 04/19/1990 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On 1.8.1990, it was disbanded and laid up in Tyva Bay (Kola Bay), where it subsequently sank due to a malfunction of the seabed and outboard fittings.

AIST

On 5.7.1952 was enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 25.12.1952 laid down in shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on 25.8.1953; entered service on 27.8.1954 and on 7.9.1954 included in the Pacific Fleet; 04.24.1965 excluded from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Lambung Mangkurat”; On November 1, 1965, it was disbanded, and in 1971 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

PUMA

May 19, 1952 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and 11/25/1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on April 29, 1953; entered service on 08/31/1954 and on 09/14/1954 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On 5.4.1962, he left Sevastopol as part of a detachment and on 5.8.1962 arrived through the Suez Canal to Surabaya; 24/1/1963 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Slamet Rijari”; On 29 January 1963 it was disbanded, and in 1975 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

KUGUAR

On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 27 March 1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 31.12.1953; entered service on 08/31/1954 and on 09/14/1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; On March 24, 1958, it was transferred to the Northern Fleet and in the spring of 1958 transferred through the inland water systems from the Baltic to the White Sea, and on 4.3.1988, after an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Severomorsk to Baltiysk, returned to the DCBF; from 10.11.1959 to 16.12.1960 Shipyard No. 820 underwent modernization and medium repair; from 2.10.1963 to 18.1.1964, from 19.10.1964 to 12.2.1965 at KMOLZ in Kronstadt, from 24.10 to 21.12.1972 at the Krasnaya Kuznitsa shipyard in Arkhangelsk, from 13.10. 1978 to September 28, 1979 and from January 19, 1983 to May 19, 1986, the SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent major and medium repairs again; 4/19/1990 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation and 10/1/1990 disbanded; in 1992 sank in the Baltic port during dismantling of mechanisms due to a malfunction of the seabed and outboard fittings.

BARSUK

May 19, 1952 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on December 2, 1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 27.2.1954; entered service on 9/15/1954 and on 9/24/1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 26.6-1.7.1972 paid a visit to Stockholm (Sweden); May 28, 1980 expelled from the Navy due to delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 1.7.1981 was disbanded.

SARYCH

On 9.2.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 24.9.1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 31.3.1953; entered service on 08/31/1954 and on 10/08/1954 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On 5.4.1962, he left Sevastopol as part of a detachment and on 5.8.1962 arrived through the Suez Canal to Surabaya; 24/1/1963 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Jons Sudarso”; On 29 January 1963 it was disbanded, and in 1974 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

SOBOL

On 1.2.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 27 September 1952 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on November 5, 1953; entered service on 13.10.1954 and 22.10.1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 10/19/1959 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the GDR Navy; renamed to “Karl Marx”; 12/31/1959 was disbanded, and in the mid-1970s. disarmed and scrapped by the East German command.

GIENA

From 18.2.1953, “Laska”. On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 5.3.1953 laid down in shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on May 18, 1954; entered service on 10/25/1954 and 11/20/1954 included in the Pacific Fleet; On August 31, 1962, it was withdrawn from service, mothballed and put to rest in Novik, and on June 19, 1981, it was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 10/1/1981 was disbanded.

WOLF

19.5.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 26.2.1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 23.7.1953; entered service on 31.10.1954 and 10.11.1954 was included in the Black Sea Fleet; 1.11.1970-1.3.1971, while on military service in the zone of military operations in the Mediterranean Sea, he performed a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt; from 5.7.1982 to 19.1.1983 at the “Sevmorzavod” them. S. Ordzhonikidze in Sevastopol underwent major repairs; 10/04/1988 expelled from the Navy, disarmed and transferred to the military-patriotic club “Young Friends of the Fleet” in Poti; On October 1, 1988, it was disbanded, and in the spring of 1991 it was cut into metal in Sevastopol.

ENOT

On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 17.10.1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on April 9, 1954; entered service on 30.10.1954 and 10.11.1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 10/19/1959 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the GDR Navy; renamed to “Friedrich Engels”; On December 31, 1959, it was disbanded, and in 1971 it was disarmed and scrapped by the East German command.

PELICAN

On March 14, 1953, it was enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 1.8.1953 laid down in the shop at Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on April 18, 1954; entered service on 11/30/1954 and on 12/15/1954 included in the Pacific Fleet; 2/28/1964 excluded from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; it was renamed into “Nuku” and on November 1, 1964 it was disbanded, and in 1973 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

FILIN

On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of the ships of the Navy and on 27.8.1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 6.6.1954; entered service on 9.12.1954 and 21.12.1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 8/6/1964 expelled from the USSR Navy; 04/29/1964 sold to the Finnish Navy; renamed to “Uusimaa”; reclassified in FR and disbanded on 1.8.1964; in 1971 it was modernized and converted by the Finns into a minelayer, and in the mid-1980s. disarmed and sold for scrap by the Finnish command.

KUNITSA

May 19, 1952 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on May 27, 1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 im. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on November 30, 1953; entered service on 23.12.1954 and 31.12.1954 was included in the Black Sea Fleet. 1-31.6.1967 and 5-24.10.1973, while on military service in the zone of hostilities in the Mediterranean Sea, carried out a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt, and 1.5-31.12.1968 – to the armed forces Syria; from 28/07/1983 to 23/01/1984 at the “Sevmorzavod” them. S. Ordzhonikidze in Sevastopol underwent medium repair; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and subsequently cut into metal in Sevastopol.

MOON

On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 20.10.1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 5.8.1954; entered service on 12/27/1954 and on 12/31/1954 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; On 7.2.1956 it was transferred to the Northern Fleet and in the spring of 1956 it moved through the inland water systems from the Baltic to the White Sea, and on 10.22.1956, after an inter-fleet crossing in the summer-autumn of 1956 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, it was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1989 disbanded.

KORSAK

On 5.7.1952 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 1.8.1953 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on April 29, 1954; entered service on 30.12.1954 and on 6.1.1955 was included in the Black Sea Fleet; On 5.4.1962, he left Sevastopol as part of a detachment and on 5.8.1962 arrived through the Suez Canal to Surabaya; 24/1/1963 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Ngurah Rai”; On 29 January 1963 it was disbanded, and in 1973 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

PENGUIN

On March 14, 1953, it was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on September 10, 1953, it was laid down in the shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on 08/13/1954; entered service on 31.12.1954 and 15.1.1955 was included in the Pacific Fleet; in the period from 12/19/1979 to 04/14/1980 and from 11/15/1984 to 10/12/1987, the shipyard in the Okocha Bay underwent medium and major repairs; 06/25/1988 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1988 disbanded.

GEPARD

1.6.1953 enlisted in the lists of the ships of the Navy and 21.12.1953 laid down in the shop of Shipyard No. 199 in Komsomolsk-on-Amur; launched (brought out of the dock) on 08/13/1954; entered service on 31.12.1954 and 15.1.1955 was included in the Pacific Fleet; in the period from 12/13/1968 to 7/26/1970 at the Severny Shipyard in Sovetskaya Gavan and from 12/21/1979 to 12/15/1980 at the shipyard in the Okocha Bay underwent medium repairs; May 31, 1984 was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 1.5.1985 was disbanded.

MINK

On March 14, 1953, he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on January 12, 1954, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on April 29, 1954; entered service on 04/30/1955 and on 05/13/1955 included in the Black Sea Fleet; 07/18/1960 after the inter-naval transition around Europe from Sevastopol to Severomorsk was transferred to the Federation Council; from 12/21/1970 to 10/01/1971 at the KMOLZ in Kronstadt, an average repair was carried out; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and subsequently cut into metal in Arkhangelsk.

KOBCHIK

On March 14, 1953, it was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on December 26, 1953, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on November 2, 1954; entered service on 31.5.1955 and 9.6.1955 was included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 26.6-1.7.1972 paid a visit to Stockholm (Sweden) and 24-28.8.1973 – to Copenhagen (Denmark); from 04/29/1982 to 11/03/1983, the SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent medium repair; in November 1985 sold to the Bulgarian Navy and renamed “Baudri”; 12/20/1985 disbanded and 2/14/1986 expelled from the USSR Navy; in the mid-1990s. disarmed and sold for scrap by the Bulgarian command.

TOUR

On March 14, 1953, it was included in the lists of the Navy ships and on March 24, 1954, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 16.12.1954; entered service on 31.5.1955 and 9.6.1955 was included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; On 2/27/1956 was transferred to the SF, but on 3/20/1956 returned to the BF; On January 14, 1957, he was expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the GDR Navy; renamed to Karl Liebknecht and disbanded on 1.3.1957; in 1971 he was disarmed and sold for scrap by the East German command.

RAVEN

On October 7, 1953, he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on March 12, 1954, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 11.11.1954; entered service on 06/18/1955 and 06/28/1955 included in the Black Sea Fleet. 1-20.6.1967 and 1.1-31.12.1968; while on military service in the war zone in the Mediterranean Sea, he carried out a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt; in the period from 25.9.1979 to 1.2.1980 and from 3.2 to 14.5.1986, the shipyard “Flotskiy Arsenal” in Varna (Bulgaria) underwent medium repair; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Sevastopol.

GRIZON

10/17/1953 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 04/15/1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 11/29/1954; entered service on 06/30/1955 and on 07/12/1955 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On 5.4.1962, he left Sevastopol as part of a detachment and on 5.8.1962 arrived through the Suez Canal to Surabaya; 24/1/1963 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Indonesian Navy; renamed to “Mongin Sidi”; On 29 January 1963 it was disbanded, and in 1970 it was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Indonesian command.

LOS

On October 7, 1953, it was included in the lists of the Navy ships and on May 26, 1954, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on March 29, 1955; entered service on 07/31/1955 and on 08/10/1955 included in the 4th Navy; from 4.1.1956 was part of the Baltic Fleet; On 7.2.1956, it was transferred to the Federation Council and in the spring of 1956 it was transferred through inland water systems from the Baltic to the White Sea; On October 22, 1956, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1956 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, it was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; On August 31, 1962, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and laid up in Severnaya Bay (Sovetskaya Gavan), but on 1.2.1985 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1987 disbanded.

DEER

11/7/1953 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 2/2/1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on April 29, 1955; entered service on 08/27/1955 and on 09/06/1955 included in the 4th BMF; from 4.1.1956 was part of the KBF; 27/02/1956 was transferred to the Federation Council, but 20/03/1956 returned to the KBF; 07/14/1956 expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the GDR Navy; renamed to “Ernst Thalmann”, and in the mid-1970s. disarmed and sold for scrap by the East German command.

SKR-51

On 20/02/1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 25/06/1954 laid down on the slipway of the Shipyard Ns 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 26.2.1955; entered service on 9/28/1955 and on 10/8/1955 included in the Black Sea Fleet; 12/31/1960 withdrawn from service; it was mothballed and first in Sevastopol, on 9/10/1968 in Ochakov and on 1/30/1975 in Donuzlav it was put to rest; from 07/12/1985 to 06/13/1988, the shipyard in Poti underwent a major overhaul; On February 15, 1989, it was reactivated and put back into operation, but on June 24, 1991, it was excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; On October 1, 1991, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Sevastopol.

SKR-52

From 8.8.1961, “Fog”. On 4.5.1954, enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 1.9.1954, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on April 15, 1955; entered service on 11/26/1955 and on 12/6/1955 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On July 18, 1960, he was transferred to the Federation Council and in the summer of 1960 made an inter-naval transition around Europe from Sevastopol to Severomorsk; On January 18, 1964, after an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Severomorsk to Liepaja, he was transferred to the KBF; from 08/20/1976 to 11/26/1976 and from 07/08/1983 to 02/28/1986 at SRZ-7 in Tallinn, medium and major overhaul was carried out; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Liepaja.

SKR-53

On 3.6.1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 20.11.1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on April 15, 1955; entered service on 31.12.1955 and 10.1.1956 was included in the Black Sea Fleet; On October 15, 1958, he was expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Bulgarian Navy and the renaming into “Smeli”, and at the end of the 1980s. disarmed and sold for scrap by the Bulgarian command.

SKR-54

1.7.1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 20.12.1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 08/31/1955; entered service on 31.12.1955 and 10.1.1956 was included in the KBF; 10/22/1956, after the inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1956 around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and then along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, was transferred to the KamVF Pacific Fleet; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1987, it was disbanded and soon in Rakovaya Bay it was planted on the coastal bank.

SKR-55

On 1.7.1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 18.2.1955 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on September 30, 1955; entered service on 31.12.1955 and 10.1.1956 was included in the KBF; 10/22/1956, after the inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1956 around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and then along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, was transferred to the KamVF Pacific Fleet; 12/15/1960 withdrawn from service; it was mothballed and put on a sludge in Novik Bay, but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/1/1987 was disbanded.

SKR-50

4.5.1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 12.10.1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 16.8.1955; entered service on 3.1.1956 and 4.1.1956 included in the KBF; 10/22/1956, after the inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1956 around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and then along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, was transferred to the KamVF Pacific Fleet; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1987, it was disbanded and soon in Rakovaya Bay was planted on the coastal sandbank.

SKR-57

6.10.1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 23.12.1954 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 21.7.1955; entered service on 2/28/1956 and on 3/16/1956 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On August 19, 1959, it was withdrawn from service, mothballed and put on hold in Sevastopol, but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; 1.1-31.12.1968, while on military service in the zone of military operations in the Mediterranean Sea, carried out a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt; from 10/07/1980 to 20/03/1981, the shipyard “Flotskiy Arsenal” in Varna (Bulgaria) underwent a medium repair; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy; 07/12/1989 transferred to the KYuM of Kiev for use for educational purposes and 10/01/1989 was disbanded.

SKR-58

6/10/1954 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 15/03/1955, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on 7/21/1955, entered service on 7/7/1956 and on 5/31/1956 included in the Black Sea Fleet, and on September 19, 1957, after the inter-fleet passage around Europe from Sevastopol to Severomorsk, it was transferred to the Northern Fleet; On December 30, 1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and first in Dolgaya-Zapadnaya Bay (settlement Granitny) and on 4/4/1970 in Sayda Bay (Gadzhievo) it was put on hold, but on January 1, 1984 it was reactivated and again put into operation; from 1.6.1985, again in the Sayda Bay, it was on conservation, and on 19.4.1990 was expelled from the Navy in connection with delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 1.6.1990 was disbanded and later cut into metal in Murmansk.

SKR-56

From 15.12.1977, “Soviet Azerbaijan”. On July 16, 1954, it was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on April 16, 1955, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 6.1.1956; entered service on May 21, 1956 and on May 31, 1956, included in the KBF; 10.10.1956 transferred to the Federation Council and in the fall of 1956 made an inter-fleet transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; 10/2/1963 transferred to LenVMB; On September 18, 1965, he became a member of the DKBF, and on November 27, 1977, after the transfer in the summer-autumn of 1977 through inland water systems from Leningrad to Baku, he became a member of the KKF; from 20.8.1958 to 7.9.1959, Shipyard No. 820 underwent modernization and medium repair; 12/15/1965 withdrawn from service and put on hold; was mothballed in Tallinn, and since 18.6.1968 – in Liepaja; 02/10/1977 reactivated and re-commissioned; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/1/1989 was disbanded.

SKR-59

04/15/1955 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 06/21/1955 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 2.2.1956, entered service on May 25, 1956 and on May 31, 1956, included in the KBF; On February 14, 1957, he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on July 14, 1957, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer of 1957 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet KamVF; On 4.5.1989, he was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation, and on October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and soon landed on the coastal bank in Rakovaya Bay.

SKR-63

From 11.11.1987 SM-141. On 5.5.1955, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 Communards in Nikolaev and 10/17/1955 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships; launched on October 28, 1955; entered service on May 30, 1956 and on June 12, 1956, was included in the Black Sea Fleet, and on September 19, 1957, after an inter-fleet passage around Europe from Sevastopol to Severomorsk, it was transferred to the Northern Fleet; On December 31, 1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in the Dolgaya-Zapadnaya Bay (Granitny settlement), but on April 30, 1985 it was reactivated and put back into operation; On 20/06/1987, disarmed, reorganized into SM to ensure the performance of combat exercises and redeployed to Sayda Bay (Gadzhievo).

SKR-60

10/17/1955 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and 12/8/1955 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on April 13, 1956; entered service on June 29, 1956 and on July 10, 1956, included in the KBF; 10.10.1956, after the inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, it was transferred to the Federation Council; 06/25/1988 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On September 1st, 1988, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Murmansk.

SKR-61

151]. 10/17/1955 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on the same day laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on May 24, 1956, commissioned on August 23, 1956 and on September 12, 1956 included in the KBF; On 2/14/1957 transferred to the Northern Fleet and in the spring of 1957 made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on 10/14/1957, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1957 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to the Far East, it was transferred to Pacific Fleet; On February 15, 1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and put to rest in Novik Bay, but on March 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; in the period from 5.7.1982 to 10.2.1984, a major overhaul was carried out at the shipyard in the Okoch Bay; On 4.5.1989, he was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation, and on October 1, 1989, it was disbanded.

SKR-62

Since 10/27/1969 Irkutsk Komsomolets. 12/20/1955 enlisted in the lists of naval ships and 12/21/1955 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on June 27, 1956; entered service on 9/25/1956 and on 10/05/1956 included in the KBF; On 02/14/1957 he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on 10/14/1957 after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay. transferred to the Far East to the Pacific Fleet; in the period from 4.6.1963 to 12.10.1964 at the “Dalzavod” in Vladivostok was overhauled; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Sovetskaya Gavan.

SKR-66

9.2.1956 was included in the lists of the Navy ships and 10.2.1956 was laid on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 named after 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on May 30, 1956; entered service on 9/29/1956 and on 10/06/1956 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On May 15, 1959, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and laid up in Sevastopol, but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; from 12/15/1963 he was at first in Sevastopol for the second time; from 10.9.1968 in Ochakov and from 21.1.1975 in Donuzlav for conservation, and on 5.5.1989 was expelled from the Navy in connection with delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; later cut into metal in Sevastopol.

SKR-64

From 10/12/1962 “Komsomolets of Lithuania”. 12/20/1955 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 8/8/1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 1.8.1956; entered service on 10/31/1956 and 11/12/1956 included in the KBF; 17-21.8.1967 paid a visit to Helsinki (Finland); in the period from 26.12.1977 to 24.12.1979, the SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent a major overhaul; 1.8.1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; On October 1, 1987 it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Liepaja.

SKR-65

9.2.1956 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 28.3.1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 4.9.1956; entered service on 27.12.1956 and 7.1.1957 included in the KBF; 4-7.8.1961 paid a visit to Helsinki (Finland); 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Liepaja.

SKR-67

On 02/09/1956 he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 01/01/1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 445 im. 61 communards in Nikolaev; launched on July 10, 1956; entered service on 22.12.1956 and 10.1.1957 included in the Black Sea Fleet; On April 12, 1957, he was expelled from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Bulgarian Navy and renaming into “Darzki” and on July 13, 1957, he was disbanded, and in 1985 he was disarmed and sold for scrap by the Bulgarian command.

SKR-68

On 1.3.1956 was enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 17 May 1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on October 27, 1956; entered service on 03.23.1957 and 2.4.1957 included in the KBF; On November 30, 1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and first in Tallinn and on 06/18/1968 in Liepaja it was laid to rest, but on October 1, 1972 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 05/22/1972, transferred to the Leningrad Navy; in the period from 28.11.1977 to 1.2.1980 and from 30.1.1985 to 6.8.1987, the KMOLZ in Kronstadt underwent a major overhaul; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On November 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Leningrad.

SKR-69

04/25/1956 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 07/29/1956 laid on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 28.12.1956; entered service on 05/30/1957 and on 06/12/1957 included in the KBF; 4-7.8.1961 paid a visit to Helsinki (Finland); 6/8/1964 excluded from the USSR Navy in connection with the sale of the Finnish Navy; renamed to “Hameenmaa”; Disbanded on 1.8.1964; in 1971 it was modernized and in 1979 it was reclassified by the Finns as a minelayer, and in the late 1980s. disarmed and sold for scrap by the Finnish command.

SKR-70

126]. 9.6.1956 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 13.8.1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 19.2.1957; entered service on June 20, 1957; 6/30/1957 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-naval transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; On 10/29/1963 he was transferred to the KBF, but on 12/21/1965 the revolt of the KSF was returned; from 10/27/1988 to 1/27/1989, the shipyard “Krasnaya Kuznitsa” in Arkhangelsk underwent a medium repair; 6/24/1991 was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and sale; 1.10.1991 was disbanded.

SKR-71

On 18/07/1956 entered the lists of the ships of the Navy and on 21/09/1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 3.4.1957; entered service on 07/13/1957; 6.8.1957 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-naval transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; 10/29/1963 was transferred to the KBF, but 12/21/1965 returned to the KSF; from 11/19/1969 to 12/20/1969, SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent medium repair; On 20.12.1969, it was decommissioned, mothballed and first in Dolgaya-Zapadnaya Bay (settlement Granitny) and on 4/4/1970 in Sayda Bay (Gadzhievo) it was put on hold, but on 1.5.1987 it was reactivated and again put into operation; 20/06/1987 withdrawn from service and reclassified into the training TFR, and on 24/06/1991 was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1991, it was disbanded and soon in the Tyuva Bay (Kola Bay) it was laid up, where it subsequently sank due to a malfunction of the bottom-outboard fittings.

SKR-72

From 20.4.1992 OT-28. 07/30/1956 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 26/01/1957 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on May 16, 1957; entered service on September 26, 1957; 5.10.1957 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-naval transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; On October 1, 1958, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Pala Bay (Polyarny), but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; 10/17/1966 was transferred to the LenNVMB, and 11/23/1967 returned to the KSF; in the period from 07/19/1972 to 12/19/1974 at the shipyard “Krasnaya Kuznitsa” in Arkhangelsk was overhauled; On the 24th of June, 1991, he was withdrawn from service for the second time, disarmed, reorganized into the OT and in the Gremikha Bay (Ostrovnoy town) put on lockdown; On September 1, 1994, he was excluded from the lists of naval vessels due to delivery to ARVI for dismantling and sale, but soon sank in the Yokangsky roadstead due to a malfunction of the bottom-outboard fittings.

SKR-73

11/12/1956 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and 12/24/1956 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on June 21, 1957; entered service on September 30, 1957; 10/18/1957 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-fleet transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; On October 1, 1958, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Sayda Bay (Gadzhievo), but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; from 10/17/1966 to 1/18/1968, from 06/11/1971 to 04/23/1973 at the SRZ-7 in Tallinn and from 12/26/1977 to 10/13/1978 at the Krasnaya Kuznitsa shipyard major and medium repairs took place in Arkhangelsk; in the summer of 1984 he was transferred through inland water systems from the White to the Caspian Sea and on November 15, 1984, he was transferred to the KKF; On 02/11/1991 he was expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation, and on 1.6.1991 it was disbanded.

SKR-74

4.2.1957 was laid on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad and on 7.2.1957 was enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy; launched on 27.7.1957; entered service on 11/26/1957 and 12/7/1957 included in the KBF; On 02/12/1958 he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on September 14, 1959, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1959 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to the Far East, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; On August 31, 1962, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and laid up in Severnaya Bay (Sovetskaya Gavan), but on 08/31/1966 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 06/25/1988 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1988 was disbanded.

SKR-75

132]. On 7.2.1957 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on March 14, 1957 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 3.9.1957; entered service on 30.12.1957 and on 6.1.1958 was included in the KBF; On 02/12/1958 he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on September 14, 1959, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1959 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to the Far East, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; On December 31, 1960, it was withdrawn from service, mothballed and in the hall. Vladimir was sucked, but on August 26, 1961, it was reactivated and put back into operation; 06/25/1988 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/01/1988 was disbanded.

SKR-76

From 10/25/1968, “Arkhangelsk Komsomolets”. On April 12, 1957, he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on April 29, 1957, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 16.12.1957; entered service on June 15, 1958; 6/28/1958 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-naval transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; 12/25/1965 was transferred to the DKBF, but on 6/24/1967 returned to the KSF; from 10/18/1973 to 10/14/1974, at SRZ-7 in Tallinn, there was a medium repair with the modernization and dismantling of the TA; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/31/1989 was disbanded and later cut into metal in Arkhangelsk.

SKR-77

From 19.4.1979, “Soviet Dagestan”. On April 12, 1957, it was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on June 17, 1957, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on January 20, 1958; entered service on June 29, 1958; 9.7.1958 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-naval transition around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk; On October 1, 1959, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Pala Bay (Polyarny), but on 07/14/1961 it was reactivated and put back into operation; from 05.24.1965 to 10.5.1968 at SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent a major overhaul; On 2/28/1969, he was transferred to the KChF and soon made an inter-naval crossing around Europe from the Kola Bay to Sevastopol, and on 8/8/1979, after being transferred through the Volga-Don Canal from the Azov to the Caspian Sea, he was transferred to the KKF; 5-24.10.1973, while on military service in the military zone of the Mediterranean Sea, he performed a combat mission to provide assistance to the armed forces of Egypt and Syria; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy; On 07/12/1989, it was transferred to the “Arga” maritime club in Makhachkala for educational use and on 10/01/1989 was disbanded.

SKR-80

On 7/31/1957 enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on 9/17/1957 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on March 13, 1958; entered service on 31.7.1958; On August 12, 1958, it was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-fleet transition from Baltiysk to Severomorsk around Scandinavia; On October 1, 1959, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Dolgaya-Zapadnaya Bay (settlement Granitny), but in February 1959 it was reactivated and put back into operation; from 9.3.1978 to 9.1.1980 at the shipyard “Krasnaya Kuznitsa” in Arkhangelsk was overhauled; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1987, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Murmansk.

SKR-81

138]. 9.8.1957 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 17.10.1957 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on April 15, 1958; entered service on 08/31/1958; 19.9.1958 was included in the Federation Council and soon made an inter-fleet transition from Baltiysk to Severomorsk around Scandinavia; from 4.1.1966 to 6.7.1967, the SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent an average repair; 06/26/1988 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; Disbanded on 1/1/1988.

SKR-4

12.24.1957 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 22.1.1958 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 07/30/1958; entered service on 13.12.1958 and 23.12.1958 was included in the KBF; On September 4, 1959, he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on September 14, 1959, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn of 1959 along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to the Far East, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; On December 15, 1965, it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Severnaya Bay (Sovetskaya Gavan), but on 08/31/1966 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; 10/1/1989 was disbanded.

SKR-5

December 24, 1957, was included in the lists of the Navy ships and on March 20, 1958, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 1.9.1958; entered service on 31.12.1958 and 17.1.1959 included in the KBF; 6/30/1963 was decommissioned, mothballed and first in Baltiysk and on 6/14/1968 in Liepaja it was laid to rest, but on 1.7.1981 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 4.5.1989 excluded from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1989, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Liepaja.

SKR-8

12.24.1957 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and 24.4.1958 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 18.10.1958; entered service on 31.12.1958 and 17.1.1959 included in the KBF; On March 21, 1963, it was decommissioned, mothballed, and first in Baltiysk and on 6/18/1968 in Liepaja it was laid to rest, but on 1.6.1980 it was reactivated and put back into operation; 04/19/1990 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On 1.10.1990 it was disbanded and on 1.6.1994, when the Russian troops were withdrawn from the territory of Latvia, was left in a half-flooded state in the Liepaja naval port at the berth; Subsequently, the UPASR of the Russian Navy was raised and transferred to a Latvian company for cutting into metal.

SKR-10

On January 26, 1957, he was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships and on November 27, 1957, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on May 30, 1958; entered service on 21.10.1958 and 31.10.1958 was included in the KBF; On September 4, 1959, he was transferred to the Northern Fleet and soon made an inter-fleet passage around Scandinavia from Baltiysk to Severomorsk, and on September 14, 1959, after an inter-fleet passage in the summer-autumn along the Northern Sea Route from the Kola Bay to the Far East, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet; On 31 January 1964 it was decommissioned, mothballed and laid up in Severnaya Bay (Sovetskaya Gavan); 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; later it was cut into metal in Sovetskaya Gavan.

SKR-14

On May 29, 1958, laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad and on 3.7.1958 was enlisted in the lists of the Navy ships; launched on January 9, 1959; entered service at the beginning of September 1959 and on September 19, 1959 was included in the KBF; On 8/31/1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed and put on hold in Tallinn, but on 8/26/1961 it was reactivated and put back into operation. From 07/27/1977 to 07/31/1978 and from 12/06/1984 to 02/28/1986, SRZ-7 in Tallinn underwent medium and overhaul repairs; 06/20/1987 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On October 1, 1987, it was disbanded and later cut into metal in Tallinn.

SKR-15

On 3.7.1958 enlisted in the lists of ships of the Navy and on 10.7.1958 laid down on the slipway of Shipyard No. 820 in Kaliningrad; launched on 27.2.1959; entered service on 1.10.1959 and 13.10.1959 was included in the KBF; On 31 September 1960, it was decommissioned, mothballed and first in Tallinn, and on 18 June 1968 in Liepaja it was put on hold; 04/19/1990 expelled from the Navy in connection with the delivery to the OFI for disarmament, dismantling and implementation; On 1.10.1990 it was disbanded and on 1.6.1994, when the Russian troops were withdrawn from the territory of Latvia, was left in a half-flooded state in the Liepaja naval port at the berth; Subsequently, the UPASR of the Russian Navy was raised and transferred to a Latvian company for cutting into metal.

Decommissions

1980: Barsuk (sank as target ship 07.1981)
1981: Giena (19.06), Leopard (3.09)
1984: Gepard (31.05)
1987: SKR-10 (20.06), SKR-14 (20.06), SKR-50 (20.06), SKR-54 (20.06), SKR-55 (20.06), SKR-64 (1.08), SKR-80 (20.06), Los (20.06), Yaguar (13.08)
1988: SKR-60 (25.06), SKR-74 (25.06), SKR-75 (25.06), SKR-81 (26.06), Volk (4.10, as civil child training ship in Poti, on scrap in 1991), Pantera (25.06), Pingvin (25.06)
1989: SKR-4 (4.05), SKR-5 (4.05), SKR-52 (4.05), SKR-56 (4.05), SKR-57 (4.05, from 12.07.1989 civil child training ship in Kiev, in 1990 sold to civil firm), SKR-59 (4.05), SKR-61 (4.05), SKR-62 (4.05), SKR-65 (4.05), SKR-66 (5.05), SKR-68 (4.05), SKR-76 (4.05), SKR-77 (4.05, from 12.07.1989 civil training ship in Makhachkala), Voron (4.05), Lun (4.05), Norka (4.05), Rosomakha (4.05), Kunitca (4.05)
1990: SKR-8 (19.04), SKR-15 (19.04), SKR-58 (19.04), Bars (19.04), Kuguar (19.04), Rys (19.04)
1991: SKR-51 (24.06), SKR-70 (24.06), SKR-71 (24.06), SKR-73 (11.02), Gornostay (24.06)
1994: SKR-72 (1.09)

Soviet Missile Corvettes
Kresta II class cruisers (1968-76)

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